This is a list of participants in the project and those who have expressed an interest. If there are any errors, outdated pieces of information, or if you wish to be added to the list, please leave information in a comment, which you can make at the bottom. 

 

Dr. Rupert Till 

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology 

Department of Music and Drama 

University of Huddersfield

R.Till@hud.ac.uk

 

Professor Chris Scarre 

Professor of Prehistory 

Department of Archaeology 

University of Durham

chris.scarre@durham.ac.uk

 

Professor Jian Kang

Worldwide University Network Environmental Acoustics Network Co-ordinator 

Fellow of the Acoustical Society of America (ASA) 

Director of Postgraduate Research 

School of Architecture 

University of Sheffield 

j.kang@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Professor Jonathan Stock

Director of the Centre for Applied and Interdisciplinary Research in Music 

Director of Research 

Department of Music 

University of Sheffield 

j.p.j.stock@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Dr. Ian Cross

Director, Centre for Music and Science

Faculty of Music

University of Cambridge

ic108[at]cam.ac.uk

 

Ian Cross has long been involved in experimental investigations of the perception of tonal structures as well as of the role of culture and formal education in shaping musical cognition. He is particularly involved in research into the relation between music and evolutionary theory, which initiated collaborations with archaeologists in the Lithoacoustics project (see http://www.mus.cam.ac.uk/~ic108/lithoacoustics/) and subsequently. He is the author of over a hundred papers and book chapters, and has co-edited three books, the most recent being the Oxford Handbook of Music Psychology (2009, with Susan Hallam and Michael Thaut). Ian Cross is also a guitarist.

 

Elizabeth Blake

Archaeologist, specialising in lithophones

ecb@cam.ac.uk

 

Dr Sarah May 

Senior Archaeologist

English Heritage Centre for Archaeology 

English Heritage

Sarah.May@english-Heritage.org.uk

 

Dr. Graeme Lawson

Expert in Music Archaeology

ancientmusic@madasafish.com

 

Dr. Bruno Fazenda 

Senior Lecturer in Music Technology 

School of Computing and Engineering 

University of Huddersfield

b.fazenda@hud.ac.uk

 

Dr. Damian Murphy 

Senior Lecturer In Music Technology 

Intelligent Systems Group/Audio Lab 

Department of Electronics 

University of York 

dtm3@ohm.york.ac.uk

 

Jude Brereton

I Hear Too Science and Heritage Research Cluster

York University

jb64@ohm.york.ac.uk

 

Aaron Watson

Aaron Watson is an Artist and Archaeologist investigating the multisensory qualities of Neolithic and Bronze Age monuments and landscapes, including ongoing acoustic investigations at locations such as Avebury, Stonehenge, and Maeshowe. His research organisation and consultancy, ‘Monumental’, collaborates with archaeologists, artists, museums and the heritage industry to explore new ways of recording, interpreting and communicating the past through fieldwork, publication, artworks, film, multimedia performance, landscape installation, and exhibitions. For more information see www.monumental.uk.com

a.watson@monumental.uk.com

 

John Crewdson

Composer, Musicians and Academic

johnwas@hotmail.com

 

Paul Devereux

Archaeologist, Author

pdevereux@onetel.com

 

Jens Holger Rindel 

Former Professor in Architectural Acoustics at the Technical University of Denmark; former project leader of the EU projects CAHRISMA (Byzantine churches and Sinan’s mosques acoustics) and ERATO (Roman theatres acoustics and music) 

Manager of Odeon, Denmark (manufacturers of leading acoustic modelling software) 

jhr@odeon.dk

 

James Flowerdew 

IMIGEA 

Interactive 2D and 3D developers of 3D virtual museum 

 

Iain Morley 

McDonald Institute for Archaeological Research 

University of Cambridge 

 

Simon Wyatt

Archaeologist with particular interest and expertise in prehistoric instruments and their reconstruction and performance

thesimon23@yahoo.co.uk

 

Prof. Bennett Zon

Head of Department of Music

University of Durham

 

Dr. Graham MacElearney

Senior Multimedia Officer

University of Sheffield

3D Graphics and Archaeology Specialist

g.mcelearney@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Eckart Lange

Landscape and Architecture

e.lange@sheffield.ac.uk

 

Professor Tim Darvill

Archaeologist

University of Bournemouth

tdarvill@bournemouth.ac.uk

 

Steve Burrow

National Museum of Wales, Cardiff

Steve.Burrow@museumwales.ac.uk

 

Seb Jouan

Arup Acoustics Glasgow

seb.jouan@arup.com

 

Richard Greer

Arup Acoustics

Richard.Greer@arup.com

 

Stacey Pagoda

 

University of East London

Multimedia / Computer Game Design

s.pogoda@uel.ac.uk

 

Claire Marshall

Music archaeologist – currently at the University of Manchester. My research is hinged upon the human experience of sound in the Neolithic and Bronze Age of Britain. I incorporate sensory perspectives on contingency of experience in space and landscapes. I also reconstruct ancient sounding devices and reconstruct the acoustics that may have been present at particular sites in the past.

claire@dotcircle.co.uk

 

Steve Marshall

Writer and musician, a regular contributor to Sound On Sound and Fortean Times. Once a composer in the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Current sound work involves converting binaural field recordings into 5.1 surround, whilst retaining impressions of height.

stevemars23@gmail.com

 

Annemieke Milks

Archaeologist, pursuing an MSc in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology at University College London.
BM in Music from University of Michigan and MM in Music from Carnegie Mellon University.

a.milks@ucal.ac.uk

 

8 Responses to “People”


  1. I attended the workshop in London on ‘sound as heritage object’ and was told about this research cluster into music in British pre-history.

    I am a music archaeologist – currently at the University of Manchester. My research is hinged upon the human experience of sound in the Neolithic and Bronze Age of Britain. I incorporate sensory perspectives on contingency of experience in space and landscapes. I also reconstruct ancient sounding devices and reconstruct the acoustics that may have been present at particular sites in the past. My work as a musician also is influenced by my work and I am interested in bringing my perspective to the research network and would like to be included in any discussions and events relating to the progress of the projects.

    Kind Regards

    Claire Marshall


  2. Writer and musician, a regular contributor to Sound On Sound and Fortean Times. Once a composer in the BBC Radiophonic Workshop. Current sound work involves converting binaural field recordings into 5.1 surround, whilst retaining impressions of height.

  3. Annemieke Milks Says:

    Archaeologist, pursuing an MSc in Palaeoanthropology and Palaeolithic Archaeology at University College London.
    BM in Music from University of Michigan and MM in Music from Carnegie Mellon University.
    a.milks@ucl.ac.uk

  4. Dr. Patrick Hunt Says:

    I’m much interested in further study of acoustics and cultural uses of echoes through prehistory and history, having studied applied acoustics as a graduate student in archaeology in Greek and Roman theater and amphitheater contexts as well as in Peru in Inca contexts and also as a musician.

    1. ruperttill Says:

      Patrick,

      there has been a lot of work on sites in South America, although I am not aware of any work relating to acoustics at Machu Picchu. There are a number of researchers involved in this network that have expertise in this area. It might make an interesting international collaborative research project to apply to go to Mach Picchu and/or Moray to measure the acoustics of the space scientifically, to capture the impulse response and analyse the results. I’m sure there would be some international funding that could be applied for.

      cheers

      Dr. Rupert Till
      Senior lecturer in music technology
      University of Huddersfield

  5. Dave Thomas. MSc.Sound Design Says:

    Independant researcher.
    My paper ‘An investigation of aural space inside Mousa broch by observation and analysis of sound and light’, is to be published (Open Source) in Issue 30 of Internet archaeology
    http://intarch.ac.uk/

  6. John Gillard Says:

    John Gillard retired composer and Music Producer Austrailia.

    After visiting Chichen Itza in 1974 in Yucatan and noticing some very odd delays and acoustic effects around the pyramids and stonework in general, I went on to visit Machu Picchu in Peru and found some even stranger ones.
    I don’t know what those guys were doing all those years ago but they were certainly doing something. Time to get The A Team in to check it out. Hit it Rupert.

  7. Iain Mott Says:

    Great site and project with really generous information – please keep me posted with updates.

    My interest in this area leans more towards geography than archaeology. The current project that I’m developing is a binaural and ambisonic study of the Brazilian landscape the “cerrado” – the savana-like vegetation of central Brazil, with the main objective of developing virtual sound environments in theatrical contexts (performance, installations
    and radiophonic art). There is some very brief information on the project at this address:

    http://audiocena.com.br/en/cerrado

    and this page will be updated as the project develops.

    Thanks,

    Iain Mott
    Departamento de Artes Cênicas
    Universidade de Brasília

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